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Luminary
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎03-06-2017
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Re: No specialized 4k HDMI HDR cable needed for my 4k HDR TV.


SonicBoom wrote:

Your issue may be the receiver, the cable or the TV.

 

Since you swapped the receiver, and the problem went away, it could point to a bad cable.  However, often re-inserting an HDMI cable can fix contact issues.

 

I would closely inspect the HDMI cable that was failing and see if it is either dirty or damaged.  I would also check the ports of both your receiver and TV.

 

Do you see this happening on other devices plugged into your TV?

 

Does this happen when you try other HDMI cables?

 

Did you try re-inserting the bad cable to see if the problem re-appears?

 

Looking at your picture, it does not look like a cable issue.  It looks like a video issue from your receiver.  

 

However, if you plug in your cable and the screen goes blank, that could be due to a bad cable.

 

If you have another method of connecting to your TV (e.g. RCA video cable), you could also try that and see if you see the same issue.

 

Then again, maybe you just want to play your Nintendo Switch. Smiley Wink


good troubleshooting info..

 

I only swap out the cable, not the receiver; the cable that goes between the receiver and the tv. 

 

I am thinking that it might be a receiver problem.... but hopefully not. 

Legendary Epic Genius
Posts: 518
Registered: ‎01-13-2012

Re: No specialized 4k HDMI HDR cable needed for my 4k HDR TV.


ralphael wrote:

good troubleshooting info..

I only swap out the cable, not the receiver; the cable that goes between the receiver and the tv. 

I am thinking that it might be a receiver problem.... but hopefully not. 


 

Yes, sorry.  I meant to say that you swapped the receiver -> TV HDMI cable, not the receiver.

 

Make sure your receiver is clean and has not accumulated a lot of dust.  If your receiver has more than one HDMI output, you may want to try that one.

 

Make sure your receiver is well-ventilated.

 

Also, if you notice the problem getting worse over time, it could point to a heat issue.

Legendary Oracle
Posts: 862
Registered: ‎11-16-2012
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Re: No specialized 4k HDMI HDR cable needed for my 4k HDR TV.


SonicBoom wrote:

Let's not forget that HDMI is digital.  If a cable is subject to interference and the signal does not get through, the results would be catastrophic.  That is, you will get little to no signal at all.  There will be no ghosting, no static, no noise.  There would be no picture, period.

 

Having said that, I have 30 ft HDMI cables which I bought in 2009 from a computer store which work fine to this day.  If you go with lengths greater than 13 m (39 ft) then you may have difficulties meeting certification due to natural attenuation of the signal.

 

Cables are all more or less the same.  An HDMI cable rated for version 1.3 or greater will work fine.

 

HDMI 2.0 and above merely introduces enhanced cable testing for "Premium High Speed HDMI Cable" so that cable manufacturers can charge more.  If you are not running 4K 60 fps, then you won't even need this.  That is also not to say that a regular cable won't pass the same signal either.


I disagree @SonicBoom. Digital signals are indeed susceptible to RFI and EMI, even though we're talking about 0's and 1's, added noise will either remove or add a 0 or a 1 to the digital signal. In extreme cases the signal will not be allowed to continue. ( I wish I could find the white paper article I read about this issue 2 years ago.)

This is why you might see some digital cables tout their shielding qualities and even be supplied with Ferrite filters to help reduce or eliminate RFI and EMI noise.

IMO, the noise I see in @ralphael 's picture is directly related to noise induced into the cables or system, short or long cables will still act as an antenna, the longer the cables, the better the antenna.

Radiated noise will be induced by other electronic equipment in the home, from lighting equipment, to an appliance or even adjacent cables or nearby power supply, poor grounding etc..

I cannot agree that cables are all more or less the same, although they are designed to make a connection and pass a signal unencumbered, some will do a better job of it than others, when connected to different equipment, and this does depend on individual components used. So as to say that, just because you bought a $100 cable, doesn't mean it will work better than another more, or less expensive cable, this will be due to electrical characteristics of each component in the chain. As each cable has different characteristics when it comes to inductance or capacitance etc.., so the result will differ with different equipment connected.

The same goes for my car's gasoline, used to be the day when an engine was tuned to specific brand of gasoline, and although it worked with other brands, the result was not as good, ie engine ping etc.., whereas today, we have an onboard computer in the car, to compensate the engine's timing/dwell etc.,  no matter what gasoline you use.

Also, I don't agree that "premium high speed cables" are labled as such, simply to alow a manufacturer to charge premium prices for a cable. These cables are tested to higher limits and are certified as such for a reason, primarily to assure the buyer/installer that the cable will not be the cause of an issue in the system.

 

 

 

 



Luminary
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎03-06-2017
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Re: No specialized 4k HDMI HDR cable needed for my 4k HDR TV.

So perhaps it is interference or just a bad HDMI cable but it is confirmed that it is the cable. After replacing the cable with a normal HDMI cable, I think it is the one from my Playstation Pro that theorectically supports 4K HDR, the problem has gone away.

 

Been playing Zelda for hours and the blackouts and purple fuzzing never appeared again; thank goodness. I did not want to return my receiver since it was the last demo model.

 

 

 

 

Legendary Oracle
Posts: 862
Registered: ‎11-16-2012
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Re: No specialized 4k HDMI HDR cable needed for my 4k HDR TV.

Process of elimination just proved it was the cable at fault.

You have nice equipment @ralphael, and it will work as good as the weakest link in the chain will allow.

High end gear, typically accentuates faults in any system, due to mismatched components, and even interconneting cables.

I found that using a power filtration distribution system, improved the results of my system also, not by much, but it was a difference.

 

 



Legendary Epic Genius
Posts: 518
Registered: ‎01-13-2012
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Re: No specialized 4k HDMI HDR cable needed for my 4k HDR TV.

[ Edited ]

So, I am glad that you managed to fix the problem.

 

As stated before, the problem is with one of the three components.  You very well may have a faulty or broken cable, but the screen shot does not indicate that, in my experience.

 

It does not look to me to be any type of RFI intterference from the cable.  The HDMI cable is a digital signal, which is encoded and decrypted.  Any noise on the cable would affect everything -- video and audio.  Furthermore the signals are twisted pair, to minimize this very effect.

 

If you play a scratched DVD, you will see the effect of not having a good HDMI signal, more than you would seeing that screenshot.

 

Also, I would not compare HDMI cables to gasoline in a car.  A better example would be the electrical wiring in your house and a light switch.

 

In any case, it is probably better to agree to disagree.  I have personally taken apart Monster cables and tested them against regular cables for my own curiosity.  I do not agree that you need 'high end cables' for high end equipment.