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Visitor
Wester
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎04-29-2011
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Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV

You can adjust the brightness yourself. But you can not ISF calabrate your tv your self. When you get your tv professionally calibrated they adjust the chromatic setting getting into the RGB colour system properly balancing the colours because manufactures put to much blue in the chromatic settings so the tv looks brighter to the eye in the store. Also they properly adjust the picture to your tv so the tv maximized the picture on movies. Anddd when it get professionally calibrated your tv uses less energy so it lasts longer.
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sdjellat
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
Job Title: Product Expert
Store: Anjou
Location: Anjou, QC
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Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV

IT IS IMPORTANT TO CALIBRATE YOUR TV, SINCE YEARS AGO IT !!WAS!! CALIBRATED SINCE THE CONSUMER DID PAY THAT EXTRA 1000$ ON THE PRICE TAG!!! NOW THEY DO NOT NEED TO PAY IT. INSTEAD TV COMPANIES TAKE ONE MODEL, CALIBRATE IT, THEN REPLICATE IT ON ABOUT 100000 MODELS AND ASSUME THEY ARE ALL CALIBRATED, KNOWING THAT ERROR IS ALWAYS THERE, NOT ALL TVS ARE CALIBRATED THE SAME WAY.

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hatrack
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎09-19-2007
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Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV

Apparently $299 doesn't include ISF calibration. It is the base price of having one input calibrated to THX standards.

 

Which as one commenter pointed out you can do yourself a lot cheaper. 

Emerging Expert
AudioDog
Posts: 98
Registered: ‎04-03-2009

Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV

[ Edited ]

It is an ISF calibration, the techs are ISF certified.

 

ISF techs may use a THX mode to cali a TV because its closer to the final result than the Dynamic mode is.  Also, the THX mode on the DVD's are to help get people,  who have never gone into the picture menu on thier TV a little help so they can have a better viewing experience than "Out Of The Box".  Even Lucas gets his stuff calibrated.

 

Also, ISF techs will do more than 1 HDMI's...I'm going to assume that you knew that all the HDMI's will calibrate the same and so we don't need to do each one seperate.  The sources that you plug into the HDMI will however need to be tweaked.

 

You can't properly calibrate your TV "by eye"...thats just making the slider bar go up and down until you "think" its good.  If you don't want to spend the $300, thats fine...it doesn't mean its not worth it, and it still doesn't make your TV any better.

 

If you can measure the Gamma, 10 Point IRE and the CMS with your eye and get it even close to the measured target without a PC, generator and probe...then my friend you need to quite your job and start doing "perfectly eyeballed" calibrations...cause I would pay to see that.

 

There are also 2 parts to the calibration process.  Calibrate the TV first, then cailbrate the sources going into the TV, ie., PC, PS3, BD player or A/V reciever.  You can't have a better picture if your sources aren't outputting video signals properly.

 

So, you can still eyeball your TV or you can use the calibration DVD, which I'm assuming you knew that it only really works if you actually calibrated the TV...and why would you use standard definition media to calibrate HD sources.  And how do you know if the DVD player is outputting the proper black levels without "crushing them", or if the "whites are clipping" and if they are, how do you fix it?

 

If you know about everything that was mentioned here and are satisfied with how your TV looks...then you wouldn't need to spend $300, cause chances are you are an ISF certified tech and you have had your TV calibrated!   :smileywink:

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Expert (TV)
dobyblue
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎06-17-2008
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Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV

Are you saying all FS techs are ISF certified?

 

Can you also tell us whether they all use the same equipment and, if so, what it is?

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Expert (TV)
sonimax
Posts: 875
Registered: ‎08-14-2008
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Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV


hatrack wrote:

Apparently $299 doesn't include ISF calibration. It is the base price of having one input calibrated to THX standards.

 

Which as one commenter pointed out you can do yourself a lot cheaper. 



That doesn't make sense cause even THX certified TVs need to be calibrated anyway!!!!!

Trust your senses, not the numbers...

Over 6,000 post
In the "forum français".
Recognized Expert / Community Ambassador
debaser17
Posts: 699
Registered: ‎06-09-2011
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Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV

Are we talking about different things here, or is the question whether or not the product literally titled "ISF Video Calibration" includes.... ISF Calibration. ?

 

ISF Video Calibration

 

If this info jives with what they say in-store, then you get 2 inputs calibrated for the $299, with addition inputs at $99 thereafter. I have this on my price watch because I do intend to get around to it sometime soon, and once in a while it goes on sale down to $200 for a week...

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Emerging Expert
AudioDog
Posts: 98
Registered: ‎04-03-2009
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Re: How to Calibrate Your HDTV

They will probably do all the HDMI's.  The HDMI's will all calibrate exactly the same, however the sources you plug in may need to be adjusted accordingly. 

 

Most TV's have a "common" video mode, say Standard or Cinema, so when you change the settings in that mode on one input, it changes that picture mode for the entire TV.  If you use a non HD source, like a VCR (eww, gross) or SD tv, the colour mode may change and need to be adjusted separately.

 

As for our equipment, we use a Sencore 400 video generator and a ColorPro CP6000 color analyzer.  We also run everything with CalMan calibration software. 

 

Not all the techs are ISF certified, but most of them are.  All the calibrators are ISF Certified.

 

http://www.imagingscience.com/dealers.php?search=Canada: Ontario

Recognized Expert
thx1138
Posts: 413
Registered: ‎04-16-2012
Job Title: Associate
Store: Deerfoot Meadows
Location: Calgary, AB
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Re: Everything you need to know about calibration is in this...

"Yea, I wouldn't pay $299 for a calibration when its something that you can obtain instructions on how to do for free through useful tech forums like this.

 

Some things are worth professional help, but others aren't.  Use the $299 to buy a better TV if you have it floating around."

 

You can do it yourself, of course! Anyone can! For free though? Yourself? Define 'free'.

 

1. Buy a spyder sensor. ($50-100).

(Woefully inaccurate, you dont know how long its been sitting on that shelf, gradually drifting out of calibration...)

2. Buy make a DIY disc, that you play through a DVD player.

(standard def colour gamut on DVD wont be same as the HDTV one displays, the DVD/BTR player introduces its own innacurracies in the chain, and have you actually set the BR player to the right settings too...)

3. Get a laptop powerful enough to run the calibration software.

( Theres a free one but its out of date, many of the instructions are in french, and you have to learn how to use it. The paid one is more user freindly, but oh, that's another $300 or so, $1500 if you want the pro more powerful version)

4. Factor in hours of time learning to use it all, and say pay yourself your usual rate you do for your own work.

(it took me 3 YEARS of study, practice and active interest in the subject, on my OWN time and doing it as a hobby for freinds/family before I even worked for FS.)

5. Then calibrate your TV. budget 5 hours.

( IF you got it down pat by now, because you have to change the patterns playing from the disc manually. Over. And. Over. Again, pay yourself your usual rate. Double check your adjustments. Using that slow disc again.

 

You can use the additonal $300 to put towards a 'better' TV. There's a catch though. No matter how much you spend on that new TV, throwing more money at a 'higher' model doesn't a better picture make.

 

SImply: when TV buying, you cant buy yourself out of the pain. A TV at $5000 has nigh on the same terrible pic quality as a $1000 from Yankmart with a brand you never heard of that sounds like a sneeze. A $5 grand TV does not have a $5 grand picture. Sorry. Once it's calibrated, yes... BAM! Theres your $5 grand picture, if not more.

 

TV's out of the box are designed to sell, not to look good. That $1000 sneeze brand from Yankmart or any other store, ISF calibrated with thousands of dollars worth of instrumentation and a good 2hrs of labour on it, will SMOKE a TV from a major brand in out of the box dynamic mode.

 

It's all about potential. Get a mini and ferarri both in beater condition. Tune the mini, turbo, strip out weight, put an expert race driver in it. It's going to be faster than the ferarri. The ferarri tuned of course would smoke the tuned mini. But the point is, its about getting the BEST out of what you have.

 

You can, of course, save yourself all the bother by buying a 3D TV that movie directors use that's been calibrated out of the box:

http://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/cat-monitors/cat-videoproduction/product-LMD2451TDPAC2/

 

You may want to sit a bit closer, as it's only 24 inches and almost $9,000...

 

Or, you could just pay the labour service and have a TV that costs less than half that ISF calibrated so it ACTS like a $9000 pro monitor...

 

 



The Imaging Science Foundation - Level II Certified Calibrator. DCS Member (Digital Cinema Society)

Recognized Expert
thx1138
Posts: 413
Registered: ‎04-16-2012
Job Title: Associate
Store: Deerfoot Meadows
Location: Calgary, AB
0

Re: Everything you need to know about calibration is in this...

"Some TVs (e.g. Plasma) will have a break-in period where the picture characteristics will change over time. So, if you get a technician to calibrate your brand new set, it may need to be redone after the break-in period."

 

True, and false. True, plasmas have a break in period. I prefer a plasma to have 200hrs *min*, 500 hrs? Even better. (break it in using the cinema/movie mode though. If in doubt, pic the dimmest pic mode and make sure you watch full screen material with no logos)

 

False, techs prefer to cali a set *after* the panel has settled in. You can insist to get it done anyway, but it's not a good idea...



The Imaging Science Foundation - Level II Certified Calibrator. DCS Member (Digital Cinema Society)

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